Agribusiness Concentration, Bachelors of Technology

The industries servicing agriculture or providing value-added processes to agricultural products account for one in six jobs and nearly one-fifth of the U.S. gross national product. Large, multicultural corporations, new input supply firms, and new emerging food manufacturers continue to need more employees with increased skills in agribusiness. Building on VU’s widely recognized associate degree in Agribusiness, the baccalaureate concentration will prepare graduates for the careers mentioned above and for advancement opportunities within these fields.

The Technology majors will develop enhanced skills in their area of technical expertise, research advancements in their technical specialty, utilize modern technical applications, and fabricate advanced technical projects. They will also gain skill sets in ethics, business management, professional relationships, manufacturing processes, and supervisory teamwork. Graduates of this technology degree program will find enhanced employment opportunities in career fields that utilize project control, industrial applications, technical supervision, manufacturing technologies, and other advanced technical specializations.

Admission into this baccalaureate degree program requires the prospective student to possess an A.S. degree from an accredited institution. Acceptance into this program will be granted through the approval of the Technology Baccalaureate Degree Department Chair and the Dean of Technology. There are six concentrations associated with the Baccalaureate program: Advanced Manufacturing, Industrial Development, Surveying Management, Information Technology, Career/Tech Education, and Agribusiness. Students who have received an AS degree can transition into this Baccalaureate Degree Concentration.

 

Major Requirements:

  • AGBS 320 - Agricultural Marketing
    • This course examines the application of marketing and economic principles of decision making in contemporary agribusiness firms. Marketing strategies, marketing research and information, segmentation and targeting, marketing mix, and market plans within food, fiber, natural resource, and production input industries will be discussed. 3 lecture hours.
  • AGBS 321 - Agribusiness Chicago Board of Trade
    • This course will look at the fundamentals of the Chicago Board of Trade starting from the open outcry trading to the technical indicators. The course will give beginning futures traders the understanding of how to get started. The students will work through the entire process to understand major reports, track prices, follow the major indicators, and more. 3 lecture hours.
  • AGBS 330 - Urban Agribusiness
    • This course examines how to maximize the productivity and sustainability of urban food production systems.  Students will bear in mind agricultural, environmental, social, and economic issues. Students will scrutinize the science and practice of urban agriculture through scientific and popular literature, case studies, discussion, and service-learning opportunities. 3 lecture hours.
  • AGBS 411 - Farm Management
    • ​​​​​​​This course uses analytical and planning techniques for making business decisions centered around farm business applications. Economic principles and management concepts such as budgeting, accounting, finance credit, investment analysis, business organization, risk, and taxes as related to practical problems of operating a farm business will be examined. 3 lecture hours.
  • AGBS 434 - Agribusiness Public Policy Issues
    • ​​​​​​​Current federal and state environmental laws and regulations and their common law foundations will be analyzed in this course. Relationship of the law and its regulatory mechanisms to economic policy issues: externalities, pollution taxes, incentives, permit trading, and cost-benefit analysis are topics covered. Other topics include major environmental topics including water and wetlands, solid and hazardous wastes, pesticides, clean air, endangered species and nuisance actions. This is an overview of the legal system. 3 lecture hours.
  • AGBS 490 - Agribusiness Capstone Financial Management
    • ​​​​​​​This class examines planning, analyzing, and controlling business performance in agriculture and related financial markets. Important topics such as the growth in vertical coordination within the food and fiber system and their significant implications for financial and risk management by those managing or financing the agricultural sector will be examined through case studies and projects. 3 lecture hours.
  • COMP 242 - Creating a Personal Brand and e-Portfolio
    • ​​​​​​​This course examines the importance of identifying and developing a personal brand.  Students will engage in a series of self- and peer-assessments that will identify skills set, value proposition and competitive differentiation.  The importance of conveying a consistent personal brand will be a focus. Students will develop professional presentation skills, interviewing and networking skills, proper social media etiquette, and participate in targeted professional associations appropriate for their desired career. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.
  • MGMT 433 - Organizational Management
    • ​​​​​​​Behavioral science concepts including leadership, managing change, negotiating, conflict resolution, team building, organizational assessment, marketing, and entrepreneurship. Overview of U.S. businesses and the implications of environmental trends. 3 lecture hours.
  • TECH 310 - Technology Project Applications I
    • ​​​​​​​This Technology Specialist course is designed to extend the student’s technical skills in an area of technology. Each student will derive a contemporary project which is directly related to their AS/AAS degree, utilize modern techniques, and fabricate an advanced technology project. The student will coordinate their project with the BS degree instructor and a technology faculty member who has a background and expertise in the student’s AS/AAS field of technology. The student will be responsible for the project development, purchase of the components, and fabrication of the project. The student will also keep a logbook and write a final report of the completed process. 5 lecture hours.
  • TECH 360 - Technology Project Applications II
    • ​​​​​​​This Technology Specialist course is a continuation of TECH 310, with the development of an enhanced multi-technical project. The student will coordinate their project with their BS degree instructor and a technology faculty member, who has a background and expertise in the student’s AS/AAS field of technology. The student will be responsible for the development, purchase of the components, and fabrication of the project. The student will also keep a logbook, write a final report of the completed process, and make a presentation of the project to the class. 5 lecture hours.
  • TECH 410 - Technology Project Research I
    • ​​​​​​​This Technology Specialist course is designed to increase the student’s ability to research advancements in their technology specialty. The student will research a special area of technology that directly relates to their AS/AAS degree’s technology field. Emphasis will be placed on the relative implications and utilization of technical research as it applies to a technical project. The project and research must first be approved by the BS degree instructor and a technology faculty member, who has a background and expertise in the student’s AS/AAS field of technology. The student will be responsible for the development, purchase of the components, and fabrication of the project. The student will also keep a logbook, write a final report of the completed process, and make a presentation of the research and the project to the class. 5 lecture hours.
  • TECH 455 - Problem Solving
    • ​​​​​​​This course is designed to introduce students to problem solving techniques which can be applied to create a more productive and efficient work environment. Topics will include, but are not limited to: problem identification, idea generation techniques, information assessment, resource analysis and allocation, ergonomics, workplace efficiency, technical communication, and group leading/interaction. The course will also cover how simple, ingenious solutions have changed the world we live in. 3 lecture hours.
  • Management (MGMT) Elective 4 hrs

 

To view information about the degree, checkout the course catalog with the link provided to the right.  http://catalog.vinu.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=29&poid=18392&returnto=2301 
To get back to the Agribusiness Home page please click: https://vinu.edu/web/guest/agribusiness 

 

For more information about the program, please contact:

Susan Brocksmith

Agribusiness Program Chair

812-888-5718

sbrocksmith@vinu.edu